Photo

(Source: withoneeye)

Video
Quote
"« O toi, ô nous deux, laissons orgueil et vindicte – notre superbe d’astres insoumis – une seule fois. Suspends ta vengeance, toi qui contenais ma semence noire de démon. Mon Père, qui fera le premier pas ? […] Trop chargé du mal et de la mort de l’espérance, trop chargé de lourdes bibliothèques et d’âmes abandonnées, je ne puis entrer là, Seigneur, car tu es mon Père et mon Seigneur. Une seule fois, Seigneur des hommes et le mien, ouvre ces portes-là, sous les cloches, une seule fois, que j’y entende une seule fois aux orgues les “Béatitudes” de Franck ou la messe du Graal de Liszt qui, moins pur, est moins redevable à la crainte de mon ombre. »"

— "Le carillon et le diable", in L’Obscur à Paris, Jean de Boschère, 1937

Quote
"« Il ne faut pas détruire les églises ; elles sont les dernières maisons de Satan, c’est là que s’ouvrira… »"

— "Les éclaboussés de venin mystique", in L’Obscur à Paris, Jean de Boschère, 1937

Photo
beautifulcentury:

372-Jugend 1908 - Heidelberg University Library Collection by mpt.1607 on Flickr.
Photo
arjuna-vallabha:

Shiva Parivar (Shiva family) by Mahaveer Swami

arjuna-vallabha:

Shiva Parivar (Shiva family) by Mahaveer Swami

Photo
dutch-and-flemish-painters:

storyhearts-journey:

Jenny Montigny - Self portrait

Jeanne (Jenny) Montigny (8 December 1875, Ghent - 31 October 1937, Deurle) was a Belgian painter.
Her father was a lawyer and government official who oversaw several boards and commissions and was later Dean of the law faculty at the University of Ghent. Her mother was of English origin. At seventeen, she decided to become an artist, knowing that she could not count on her parent’s support. (Her father once remarked “De kunsten laten me helemaal koud.”…The arts leave me totally cold.)
After seeing a painting by Emile Claus (The Kingfishers), she decided to seek out a position in his studios near Deinze. In the summer of 1893, she and several other female students took his course in plein air painting. After 1895, she commuted regularly between Ghent and Deinze. Despite the fact that Claus was married and twenty-six years her senior, they began a relationship that lasted until his death in 1924. In 1902, she made her debut at the Ghent Salon, followed by shows in Paris. Two years later, she and her younger brother moved into a villa in Deurle. She later became of the luminist group Vie et Lumière.
At the outbreak of World War I, she followed Claus and his wife in emigrating to London, where she became a member of the Women’s International Art Club and exhibited at the Grafton Galleries. After the war, she returned to Belgium and, finding it necessary to sell her villa, moved into a more modest home. In 1923, she joined the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts. After Claus’ death, she found herself in worsening financial straits. Her painting style was no longer popular and it was necessary to accept charity from family and friends. She was largely forgotten after her death until 1987, when exhibitions were held in Deurle and Dienze. In 1995, a major retrospective took place at the Musée Pissarro in Pontoise.
Luminism is a late-impressionist or neo-impressionist style in painting which devotes great attention to light effects.
The term has been used for the style of the Belgian painters such as Emile Claus and Théo van Rysselberghe and their followers (Adriaan Jozef Heymans, Anna Boch, Évariste Carpentier, Guillaume Van Strydonck, Leon De Smet (nl), Jenny Montigny, Anna De Weert (nl), George Morren (1868-1941), Modest Huys, Georges Buysse (nl), Marcel Jefferys (nl), Yvonne Serruys and Juliette Wytsman (nl), as well as for the early pointillist work of the Dutch painters Jan Toorop, Leo Gestel, Jan Sluijters, and Piet Mondriaan.
Both styles have little in common. Emile Claus’s work is still close to that of the great French impressionists, especially Claude Monet, whereas Dutch luminism, characterized by the use of large color patches, is closer to fauvism.

dutch-and-flemish-painters:

storyhearts-journey:

Jenny Montigny - Self portrait

Jeanne (Jenny) Montigny (8 December 1875, Ghent - 31 October 1937, Deurle) was a Belgian painter.

Her father was a lawyer and government official who oversaw several boards and commissions and was later Dean of the law faculty at the University of Ghent. Her mother was of English origin. At seventeen, she decided to become an artist, knowing that she could not count on her parent’s support. (Her father once remarked “De kunsten laten me helemaal koud.”…The arts leave me totally cold.)

After seeing a painting by Emile Claus (The Kingfishers), she decided to seek out a position in his studios near Deinze. In the summer of 1893, she and several other female students took his course in plein air painting. After 1895, she commuted regularly between Ghent and Deinze. Despite the fact that Claus was married and twenty-six years her senior, they began a relationship that lasted until his death in 1924. In 1902, she made her debut at the Ghent Salon, followed by shows in Paris. Two years later, she and her younger brother moved into a villa in Deurle. She later became of the luminist group Vie et Lumière.

At the outbreak of World War I, she followed Claus and his wife in emigrating to London, where she became a member of the Women’s International Art Club and exhibited at the Grafton Galleries. After the war, she returned to Belgium and, finding it necessary to sell her villa, moved into a more modest home. In 1923, she joined the Société Nationale des Beaux-Arts. After Claus’ death, she found herself in worsening financial straits. Her painting style was no longer popular and it was necessary to accept charity from family and friends. She was largely forgotten after her death until 1987, when exhibitions were held in Deurle and Dienze. In 1995, a major retrospective took place at the Musée Pissarro in Pontoise.

Luminism is a late-impressionist or neo-impressionist style in painting which devotes great attention to light effects.

The term has been used for the style of the Belgian painters such as Emile Claus and Théo van Rysselberghe and their followers (Adriaan Jozef Heymans, Anna Boch, Évariste Carpentier, Guillaume Van Strydonck, Leon De Smet (nl), Jenny Montigny, Anna De Weert (nl), George Morren (1868-1941), Modest Huys, Georges Buysse (nl), Marcel Jefferys (nl), Yvonne Serruys and Juliette Wytsman (nl), as well as for the early pointillist work of the Dutch painters Jan Toorop, Leo Gestel, Jan Sluijters, and Piet Mondriaan.

Both styles have little in common. Emile Claus’s work is still close to that of the great French impressionists, especially Claude Monet, whereas Dutch luminism, characterized by the use of large color patches, is closer to fauvism.

Photo
madivinecomedie:

Léon Spilliaert (Belgian, 1881-1946), Solitude, 1909
via

madivinecomedie:

Léon Spilliaert (Belgian, 1881-1946), Solitude, 1909

via

(via lemortjoyeux)

Photoset

Head of Medusa - Rubens

(Source: marcuscrassus, via archivesdureve)

Photo
amalgammaray:

Hans Bellmer. Unica Tied, 1959.

amalgammaray:

Hans Bellmer. Unica Tied, 1959.

(Source: latenebreuse, via lemortjoyeux)

Photo
animus-inviolabilis:

La femme à la pèlerine(Woman in a Cape)Albert Besnard1889

animus-inviolabilis:

La femme à la pèlerine
(Woman in a Cape)

Albert Besnard

1889

(via lemortjoyeux)

Photo
svell:

Hugo Simberg, The Garden of Death, 1896.

svell:

Hugo Simberg, The Garden of Death, 1896.

(Source: Wikipedia, via lemortjoyeux)

Photo

(Source: quincaza, via lemortjoyeux)